Exotic Pet Sitting

Thanks to Guest Author Nicolas Bowman  of Pet and People Sitters for this article

It may seem crazy to think about, but all pets need to be pet-sit at one point or another. Sure, dogs, cats, and other “basic” pets need that occasional pet sitter when a family goes out of town, or if a person works long hours and needs somebody to care for their pet during the day to avoid health issues.

The Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans) ...

The Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans) is a species of tortoise found in dry areas and scrub forest in India and Sri Lanka. This species is quite popular in the exotic pet trade. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

But not everybody has a dog or a cat, after all – some people have birds, lizards, horses, pigs, and all other forms of exotic pets that need special and specific care and must be treated carefully and professionally at all times, regardless of needs and specific dietary or lifestyle restrictions.

After all, it can be quite complicated to find a high quality exotic pet sitter, as it can be a challenge to find a company or individual who can totally and fully understand the specific needs of your pet. And, like so many other pet owners, exotic pet owners are understandably very particular and concerned with their pet’s lifestyle and needs, so much so that it is important to pick an exotic pet sitter carefully.

Español: Iguana verde adulta

Español: Iguana verde adulta (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

But what can you really get out of a good exotic pet sitter in Denver, anyways? Here are just a few important things to consider when using the services of an exotic pet sitter:

 

 

 

Professional house sitting

 

First and foremost, a professional exotic pet sitter provides a professional experience. You don’t need to worry about the guy down the street that you hired to rifle through your things while you are gone; with a professional, you get the best you can expect without having to worry about the results as you enjoy great pet sitting experiences from a respected and respectable company.

 

 

English: A female Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus...

English: A female Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) clinging strongly to a human arm (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Care and understanding of your pet’s needs

 

Exotic pet sitters work to the point where they fully and completely understand exactly what it is your pet needs and deserves, no matter their background, medical history, or level of exoticness. In fact, professional pet sitters work hard to maintain professionalism in knowing exactly the care your pet needs, as they are experts in a variety of exotic and non-traditional pets that may require more specific care and more focused love than a normal dog or cat.

 

 

 

Experience and a good reputation

 

Cebus apella group. Capuchin Monkeys Sharing

Cebus apella group. Capuchin Monkeys Sharing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Finally, a professional pet sitting company like ours provides a great experience and a great reputation with which to work. No longer do you need to worry about bad happenings with your pets or your home, as our company works tirelessly to build a professional reputation with everything that you have and with your beloved pet. We will see to it that you and your pet are satisfied and happy by the end of the stay, and that you get the most out of your investment.    Pet and People Sitters

Doggy Emergencies – 4 Common Reasons To Call Your Vet

Thanks to Guest Author Mila Joseph for this article.

No matter how well we look after our pets, sometimes they end up suffering from the effects of a life threatening health problem. Some problems are easily treated, but others require emergency intervention from a veterinarian. Pet emergencies come in all shapes and sizes, but here are a few of the most common reasons for an out of hours visit to the vet.

1. Eating the Wrong Foods

A lot of people treat their canine best friend as another human. This is fatal. Dogs are not people and should not be treated as such. They can’t eat the same food as us without suffering from side effects because their digestive systems are not designed to cope with the things we like to eat. Chocolate is particularly dangerous to dogs, so never feed your pet chocolate unless it is a pet-friendly variety. Other foods your dog should never eat are grapes and raisins.

2. Poisoning

Aside from poisonous foods, dogs are also susceptible to ingesting other types of poison. Rodent poisons are sometimes attractive to dogs, especially the types of dogs who will eat anything. Symptoms of poisoning include:

  • Foaming at the mouth
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Bleeding from the nose and mouth

To prevent a poisoning incident, never put rat poison down where a dog may find it, and if you suspect your dog may have ingested rodent poison take him to the vet immediately.

3. Swallowing Foreign Objects

Some dogs find it impossible to distinguish between food and foreign objects. This means a lone sock or a plastic ball is fair game to a Labrador with a penchant for chewing. The trouble is a lot of dogs end up in the emergency room having ingested a totally inappropriate object. Small objects can often pass straight through, but larger or awkward objects get stuck and end up causing a potentially fatal intestinal blockage. Symptoms include:

  • Distended abdomen
  • Constipation
  • Discomfort
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea

4. Allergic Reaction

Dogs are just as susceptible to allergic reactions as humans, so if a bee stings your pet or he comes into contact with some other allergen, he may go into anaphylactic shock, which is a life threatening allergic reaction. Dogs often develop allergies over time, so be vigilant to the symptoms, which may include:

  • Itchy/runny eyes
  • Excessive scratching
  • Sneezing
  • Scabby/itchy skin

If a dog has allergies to pollen and dust, he is likely to be allergic to an insect sting or bite. And if the worst happens and he has a massive allergic reaction to an allergenic substance, he will need to be taken to the emergency room immediately.

Unfortunately, it can often be difficult to figure out what is wrong with your pet when his symptoms are not clear-cut. If in doubt, you should always contact a vet for advice, and if you suspect your dog has eaten something he shouldn’t have (particularly if he may have ingested human medication), make sure you give your vet as much information as possible.

The author of this post is Mila Joseph, an employee at Pleasant Plains, a leading veterinary hospital in New York. Mila is also an animal rights activist and spends her weekends hiking with her friends.

Losing A Pet Is Losing A Member Of The Family – Here’s How To Get Through It.

Thanks to Guest Author Nancy Baker for this article.

A pet, whether it’s a dog, a cat, a rabbit, a guinea pig, a gerbil or a horse is part of the family, and is widely loved and known by everyone. Pets can stay in the family for years and they can be an important part of your children’s upbringing. Pets bring so much joy – they can entertain you, make you laugh, play with you and charm you with their little personalities. So, when the time comes and they pass away it can be very difficult to cope with your grief. In this article we will give you some help for dealing with things when the inevitable happens and your pet passes on.

Release Your Guilt

Often, when a pet dies, you can end up feeling pretty guilty because you think that there is more that you could have done. Perhaps you weren’t up to date with their injections at the vet, or perhaps you feel that you just didn’t spend enough quality time with them. Maybe you didn’t realize that they were ill, or maybe you were the one with the horrible job of asking a vet to put them down. There is often a lot of guilt associated with the loss of a pet, so if you are feeling in any way guilty then try to let yourself off the hook. Remember all the good things you did for your pet, and remember how well they were treated.

Explain it to the Children

Your children will take the death of a pet very badly too so it’s important to help them process their grief. Depending on their age, they may not be able to process all of the emotions that they are feeling, so it’s really vital that you let them talk through their feelings. Don’t rush out and get a replacement straight away – your kids will probably want you to do this but they are actually then missing out on an important stage of the grieving process. No animal can be ‘replaced’ any more than a human being can – they are all one-offs just like us. Understand that your children are going to be sad about it for a while but distract them by talking about all the good times that you had with your pet.

Get Rid of the Reminders

One of the hardest things about losing a pet is all the reminders of their absence. So throw away their food (or give it to someone you know that can use it). Take their food bowl and put it away in a cupboard, and try and remove all other signs of them from the house and garden. Of course, you will get a new pet in time, but for the time being it’s best to stop taunting yourself with constant reminders.

When the time comes and you feel ready, it may be a good idea to start looking for a new pet. They will be a very welcome, much-loved addition to the family and they will bring their own personality to the mix!

Nancy Baker, the author of this article, is a freelance blogger, currently writing for, Pond Point Animal Hospital, leading providers of preventive and emergency veterinarian services for your pets. She is an avid badminton fan and participates in amateur tournaments in the city. You can contact Nancy @Nancy_Baker_.

6 Reasons Your Next Pet Should Be an Adopted One

Thanks to Live In Nanny for this article.

 

Perhaps one of the most defining characteristics of humanity is our willingness — and passion — for caring for animals. Having a pet enriches our lives, both for the animal and for the caretaker. People who share their homes and their lives with their pets know that unconditional love, both given and received, enhances our life experience. While there is nothing inherently wrong with having a pedigreed pet, more and more animal lovers are discovering that a pet adoption from a shelter or rescue organization is a viable and rewarding choice. Compiled here are six solid reasons why you should consider adopting your next pet.

 

Adopt a pet, save a life. 

 

English: Animal Rescue

English: Animal Rescue (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has published estimates showing that 6-8 million dogs and cats enter shelters annually. Nearly half of them are euthanized. Though these figures are appalling, they represent great strides in progress. Just 40 years ago, HSUS records showed that American shelters euthanized 12-20 million dogs and cats. At that time, there were 67 million pets in homes. Now it is estimated that 2.7 million cats and dogs in shelters are euthanized annually — approximately 3% of the 135 million pets in homes in this country. By adopting your next pet, you can help to reduce the number of pets killed by euthanasia to zero. Learn more at the Humane Society’s site.

 

Pets are good for kids.

Both dogs and cats are a very healthy part of the lives of millions of children, and studies by child psychologists, doctors and pet trainers conclude that having a pet aids in the development and social well-being of a child. Immune systems develop faster when kids are raised in homes with pets, and they tend to have fewer incidences of common colds and allergies. Kids with dogs also spend more time outside playing with their pets, which reduces stress, loneliness and anxiety, and may even help lower blood pressure. As children learn to feed and care for their companions, they are encouraged to become more responsible and they show better impulse control, higher self-esteem and better interactive social skills. Parents report that sharing the love and care of animals forges better sibling bonds, too.

 

No-kill shelters need your help.

Photo of a dog behind a chain-link fence at th...

Photo of a dog behind a chain-link fence at the Paws and More No Kill Animal Shelter in Washington, Iowa. I took this picture. This looks just like my dog Yuma. He was from a shelter in Evanston Il. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Choosing a dog or cat from a no-kill shelter allows that shelter to take in a new animal. Most animal sanctuaries are non-profit organizations that survive on the goodwill of pet lovers, Good Samaritans and volunteers who staff these facilities. As their population increases, each life-sustaining shelter faces the costs of expansion, greater food and medical expenses and, often, limited resources. As the population of pets that are not adopted ages, they must care for more special-needs pets that must be cared for until the end of their natural lives.

 

If you are adopting a new pet for a child, choosing a shelter animal can open a young person’s eyes to the plight of homeless pets. In addition to teaching the child compassion and responsibility, sharing in the decision to provide a home for a pet that might otherwise be caged for life is a character-building and rewarding experience. The Shelter Pet Project is a great starting place.

 

No housebreaking required.

The majority of animals in shelters are housebroken or litter box trained, and more mature dogs know basic obedience commands. Many shelters have dedicated staffs that work with animals to overcome training or behavioral issues. When you adopt a pet from one of these organizations, you will know what to expect from your dog or cat when you bring your new pet home. The Best Friends Animal Society is a great resource for learning more about shelter animals.

 

Adopted pets are healthier than you think.

English: Galveston Island, TX, September 17, 2...

English: Galveston Island, TX, September 17, 2088 — Dogs displaced by Hurricane Ike are sheltered at the local center set up by the Humane Society. Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Animal shelters have happy, healthy animals waiting for someone to take them home. Not only do most shelters vaccinate, spay or neuter animals before adoption, they also screen animals for specific temperaments and behaviors to ensure you get a pet that fits your lifestyle. A common misconception is that animals are in shelters because they were abused or have behavioral issues.

 

Animals enter shelters because of circumstances beyond their control. A new baby, death in the family, divorce, illness or a move that excludes the pets are common reasons for pet abandonment. Unfortunately, many animals are simply discarded by pet owners who should never have had a pet in the first place. Most shelter dogs and cats are healthy, affectionate animals. According to the ASPCA, less than one in 100 people who adopt a pet from a shelter are dissatisfied.

 

Shelter animals are a bargain.

Adoption fees at most shelters are very reasonable — usually between $50 and $250 —making your decision to adopt a pet a financially smart one. Buying a pet from a pet store or breeder can cost thousands of dollars, and the costs just begin there. Shelter animals are spayed or neutered before adoption, so you immediately save the cost of surgery. Physical examinations and vaccinations are routine, and some shelters microchip animals, too.

Choose your pet carefully, taking into consideration your personal lifestyle, the ages of your family members, the behavioral characteristics of the breed, and the amount of care and maintenance your new pet will require. A good choice will bring you immeasurable joy and happiness, and you’ve already made a great choice if you choose to adopt a pet from a shelter.