The Psychology of Dogs

Man and his canine companion represent a relationship that stretches back to at least 30,000 B.C.. At this time period, it is thought that humans hunted alongside with packs of wild dogs, each party taking advantage of the other’s presence when it came to killing and gathering food. It is possible that man was living and developing meaningful, domestic relationships with these four-legged creatures by the year 12,000 B.C.. Remains of dogs and humans dating back to this time period were buried together, suggesting value in terms of a partnership.

By 10,000 B.C., we start to find evidence of different breeds of dogs, making the idea of domestication a certainty. Once 1,500 B.C.E. Rolls around, we see the first instances of modern breeds that are still in existence today. The dogs with the oldest roots stretch across every continent on the globe. In North America, we find the Spitz while in China there are Chow Chows, Asian Spaniels, and Feral Dogs. European countries are still home to breeds such as Terriers, Mastiffs, and Herding Dogs.

The domestication of dogs over time is not one to come as a surprise. The process was slow and continuous but completely in line with the needs and evolution of dogs over time. Wild dogs quickly realized that being near human settlements would equal greater food supplies for their offspring. As humans interacted in increasing numbers with puppies and adult canines, the dogs became less fearful and the puppies were open to socialization from a young age. Interestingly enough the electric dog fence systems show a relevant aspect of dogs and dogs in territorial boundaries, as strange as it seems an electric fence is shows a means of a dogs natural evolution of learning boundaries in nature. These simple training devices can be purchased on electric dog fences amazon or other various websites

Dogs continued to evolve, developing many of the capacities for emotion that now make them so attractive to the average human. Chief among their emotional capacities is the ability to love and return human affection. For this reason, nearly 46 percent of all households in the United States own at least one dog. In addition to providing love and devotion to their owners, dogs can share in feelings of excitement, contentment, fear, and joy. Dogs even engage in dreams on a nightly basis as well. Dogs also experience a high degree of affection from human beings due to the emotions that they rarely develop that we do not typically value in other human beings. These emotions include guilt, pride, contempt, and shame.

Source: Best Psychology Degrees Guide

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